2019 Resources Career Central Career Development Workshops

The following Career Development Workshops will take place from Sunday, April 6 to Tuesday, April 9, in the Convention Center. Running 60 to 90 minutes, these Workshops are designed to provide attendees with diverse education, career planning, and continuing education information.

Saturday, April 6

Beyond the Weight Room: The Importance of Skeletal Muscle in Health and Disease (Supported by APS Strategic Partner ADInstruments and cosponsored by Advances in Physiology Education)
8 a.m.-12 p.m. | Convention Center, W314

The purpose of this refresher course is to provide an intensive overview and content update on a topic relevant to medical school physiology teachers. For 2019, we will provide an update on what medical students should be taught about skeletal muscle physiology with particular emphasis on updates regarding the role of skeletal muscle beyond strength and how it is related to overall health and disease. Emphasis will be placed on new developments that should be included in the pre-clinical physiology curriculum.

Volunteering for Professional Associations & Societies: What It’s Like & What It Takes
8:30-10 a.m. | Convention Center, W208BC

Buckle Up! It’s a Jungle Out There: Navigating the Career Highs and Lows
10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. | Convention Center, W208BC

Teaching Institute: Pharmacology Education ADME: Audience, Design, Modality and Experimentation
11 a.m.- 1 p.m. | Convention Center, W206C

Amidst a changing environment of pharmacology instruction on campuses, this symposium will share information about how to innovate teaching. The symposium will overview new and innovative educational strategies, courses, and programs that bring pharmacology to new and diverse audiences. We will discuss the growing demand for pharmacology instruction beyond conventional brick-and-mortar settings and professional student audiences, examine the needs of diverse groups of learners, and showcase the design and implementation of innovative instructional strategies. Challenges and opportunities will be discussed. Concepts to be discussed, including online education, apply to pharmacology as well as a wide variety of basic science disciplines.

Publishing in AAA journals: Tips and Insights from all Three Editors
12-1 p.m. | Convention Center, W207B

AAA Career Networking Lunch

A Role for Professional Societies in Addressing and Preventing Sexual Harassment in the Sciences
1-3 p.m. | Convention Center, W309AB

The 2018 report on the sexual harassment of women in the sciences issued by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM) focused attention on an issue that has long plagued the scientific community. This symposium will review the primary findings of the landmark report; help participants understand the impact of sexual harassment in the sciences; and explore ways that professional societies can play a role in protecting all members and creating an environment where the risk of harassment is minimized. The NASEM report offers specific definitions of sexual harassment and identifies several characteristics of academic science and medicine that create a higher risk that harassment will occur. The report also details the negative impact that harassment has not only on the targets of harassment, but also other members of the community. The report goes on to offer a number of recommendations to address these long-standing problems, including steps that professional societies such as the APS can take. The symposium will review these findings and include an interactive component where members of the audience can share their ideas for best practices.

Balancing Content, Critical Thinking and Creativity in Graduate Education
2-4 p.m. | Convention Center, W206C

A major challenge in graduate education is to incorporate the ever increasing technological advances and subsequent discoveries into existing PhD programs without extending the duration of training. The goal of this symposium is to draw from innovative programs to illustrate how to foster skills such as creativity and critical thinking into training programs without losing discipline specific content. A panel discussion will address emerging needs from the perspective of graduate students, program directors, and training faculty. The symposium features programs in pharmacology and other disciplines and will be of a broad interest for attendees of Experimental Biology.
     
ASPET Graduate Student - Postdoctoral Colloquium: Building Winning Career Connections: The Art of Self-Promotion
2-4 p.m. | Convention Center

The Graduate Student-Postdoctoral Colloquium aims to provide an interactive learning experience for trainees in topics that will benefit their professional development while encouraging networking with their peers.

Sunday, April 7, 2019

Career Planning: No Scientist Left Behind (Sunday)
7-8 a.m. | Convention Center, W311C

In this symposium entitled “Career Planning: No Scientist Left Behind” sponsored by the Women in Physiology Committee, we will focus on a variety of topics. Topics to be covered include: 1) effectively dealing with and overcoming career interruptions; 2) how to fix the leaky pipeline by successfully promoting diversity and women in science; 3) what keeps women from rising to the highest ranks of academia and how to break the glass ceiling; and 4) identifying structural issues and successes within institutions. We will have three speakers. Our first speaker will be Dr. Jacqueline Limberg (a junior/early career scientist) from the University of Missouri. She will focus on dealing with multiple commitments to work/family/health and how she has successfully overcome a career interruption. The second speaker will be Dr. Irving Vega (a mid-career scientist) from Michigan State University. He will discuss successfully promoting diversity and women in science and “how to fix the leaky pipeline” vs . "how do we keep the faucet going". Our last speaker will be Dr. Nancy Fjortoft (Dean of Pharmacy) from Midwestern University. She will focus on how to break the glass ceiling in science by describing the successes seen at Midwestern University as inclusion has been achieved at the highest leadership levels at this institution. The goal of this symposium is to educate the audience on how to successfully deal with career interruptions, provide tips on how to promote diversity and women in science in order to “keep the faucet going”, and how to break the glass ceiling in science.
     
Marketing Yourself for a Successful Career I
7-8 a.m. | Convention Center, W311B

Having a successful career in both academic and non-academic environment requires constant and deliberate marketing of one’s self in order to get the desired job and to keep it. In a world that is highly competitive, it is extremely important that trainees begin early in their career to cultivate the skills needed to stand out as a competitive job applicant or a competitive candidate for promotion in the future. Aside from having excellent communication skills in scientific writing, there are other numerous career development abilities that are vital for continued success. These include taking on leadership positions within and outside of the laboratory environment, project and time management skills, building scientific network locally and nationally, and engaging in service and mentoring opportunities. To ensure that trainees are well prepared for a successful career in the future, the Trainee Advisory Committee (TAC) have invited experienced speakers to address three major areas of career development over the course of three days. The three areas are: 1) How to Build Marketable Skills, 2) How to Market yourself on Paper, and 3) How to Market yourself through Networking. Each speaker will give a 45 minutes presentation followed by a 15 minutes question and answer session. At the end of the symposium, trainees will have gained an understanding of how to develop the skills that are necessary to successfully market themselves for their desired job in any scientific setting.
 
The Hidden Job: Aspects of a Physiology Career You May not be Aware of
7-8 a.m. | Convention Center, W311D

This symposium is targeted at scientists and trainees interested in learning about aspects of careers in science that are not commonly part of traditional training. Issue: Careers in science require the development of a number of skills and proficiencies that extend beyond the normal training practices, which are primarily focused on technical, writing, and other “hard” skills. These include such things as negotiation skills, hiring and firing of lab personnel, scientific society involvement, areas of service, administrative responsibilities, organizing meetings and symposia, moving between academia and industry, and many others. The focus will be on those skills that are not a common aspect of training. Speakers will address these issues from a perspective of “what I wish I knew before I started this job” and “things no one told me I needed to know before I started.” Specific Goals of the Symposium: This symposium aims to discuss these topics in an interactive format facilitated by leaders in academic, industry, teaching, governmental, and society roles. The targeted audience of trainees and established investigators alike will be exposed to the perspectives of the facilitators and will be able to incorporate the non-traditional training advice of the facilitators into their individual career plans. Specific Questions the Panelists will Address: What skills are needed to manage a diverse group of individuals (hiring, firing, conflict management, etc.)? How do you transition from one sector to another, such as moves from academia to industry, military to civilian, industry to academia, etc.? How do you transition roles within your institution (administration, teaching, etc.)? How is career advancement evaluated and accomplished in my field (academia, industry, teaching, etc)? The junk drawer – what are the miscellaneous skills and responsibilities of my career that I was never formally trained in?
     
Publications 101 Workshop
8:30-10 a.m. | Convention Center, W309AB

Whether you’re new to scientific publishing, have many research papers to your credit or are a seasoned investigator, errors in presenting your research for publication may cause honest hard work to be muddied and dent your credibility. APS has developed the Publishing 101 Workshop on best practice in scientific publishing to includes tips on what to consider when submitting your manuscript as well as tips for avoiding publication ethics and copyright pitfalls.
    
Journals Workshop: An Interactive Guide to Publishing, Reviewing, and Ethics Issues
3-5 p.m. | Convention Center, W206B

The editors of ASPET's journals will lead an interactive workshop to address issues such as manuscript preparation, the review process, what makes a good reviewer, publishing ethics, and copyright issues. Following brief presentations, participants will work with associate editors in small groups to answer questions and work through scenarios addressed by the speakers. Additional questions from participants are encouraged. The workshop is appropriate for students at all levels, postbacs/postdocs, and anyone needing to learn more about the publication process.

Monday, April 8, 2019

Career Planning: No Scientist Left Behind (Monday)
7-8 a.m. | Convention Center, W311C

In this symposium entitled “Career Planning: No Scientist Left Behind” sponsored by the Women in Physiology Committee, we will focus on a variety of topics. Topics to be covered include: 1) effectively dealing with and overcoming career interruptions; 2) how to fix the leaky pipeline by successfully promoting diversity and women in science; 3) what keeps women from rising to the highest ranks of academia and how to break the glass ceiling; and 4) identifying structural issues and successes within institutions. We will have three speakers. Our first speaker will be Dr. Jacqueline Limberg (a junior/early career scientist) from the University of Missouri. She will focus on dealing with multiple commitments to work/family/health and how she has successfully overcome a career interruption. The second speaker will be Dr. Irving Vega (a mid-career scientist) from Michigan State University. He will discuss successfully promoting diversity and women in science and “how to fix the leaky pipeline” vs . "how do we keep the faucet going". Our last speaker will be Dr. Nancy Fjortoft (Dean of Pharmacy) from Midwestern University. She will focus on how to break the glass ceiling in science by describing the successes seen at Midwestern University as inclusion has been achieved at the highest leadership levels at this institution. The goal of this symposium is to educate the audience on how to successfully deal with career interruptions, provide tips on how to promote diversity and women in science in order to “keep the faucet going”, and how to break the glass ceiling in science.
    
Marketing Yourself for a Successful Career II
7-8 a.m. | Convention Center, W311B

Having a successful career in both academic and non-academic environment requires constant and deliberate marketing of one’s self in order to get the desired job and to keep it. In a world that is highly competitive, it is extremely important that trainees begin early in their career to cultivate the skills needed to stand out as a competitive job applicant or a competitive candidate for promotion in the future. Aside from having excellent communication skills in scientific writing, there are other numerous career development abilities that are vital for continued success. These include taking on leadership positions within and outside of the laboratory environment, project and time management skills, building scientific network locally and nationally, and engaging in service and mentoring opportunities. To ensure that trainees are well prepared for a successful career in the future, the Trainee Advisory Committee (TAC) have invited experienced speakers to address three major areas of career development over the course of three days. The three areas are: 1) How to Build Marketable Skills, 2) How to Market yourself on Paper, and 3) How to Market yourself through Networking. Each speaker will give a 45 minutes presentation followed by a 15 minutes question and answer session. At the end of the symposium, trainees will have gained an understanding of how to develop the skills that are necessary to successfully market themselves for their desired job in any scientific setting.
     
The Hidden Job: Aspects of a Physiology Career You May not be Aware of
7-8 a.m. | Convention Center, W311D

This symposium is targeted at scientists and trainees interested in learning about aspects of careers in science that are not commonly part of traditional training. Issue: Careers in science require the development of a number of skills and proficiencies that extend beyond the normal training practices, which are primarily focused on technical, writing, and other “hard” skills. These include such things as negotiation skills, hiring and firing of lab personnel, scientific society involvement, areas of service, administrative responsibilities, organizing meetings and symposia, moving between academia and industry, and many others. The focus will be on those skills that are not a common aspect of training. Speakers will address these issues from a perspective of “what I wish I knew before I started this job” and “things no one told me I needed to know before I started.” Specific Goals of the Symposium: This symposium aims to discuss these topics in an interactive format facilitated by leaders in academic, industry, teaching, governmental, and society roles. The targeted audience of trainees and established investigators alike will be exposed to the perspectives of the facilitators and will be able to incorporate the non-traditional training advice of the facilitators into their individual career plans. Specific Questions the Panelists will Address: What skills are needed to manage a diverse group of individuals (hiring, firing, conflict management, etc.)? How do you transition from one sector to another, such as moves from academia to industry, military to civilian, industry to academia, etc.? How do you transition roles within your institution (administration, teaching, etc.)? How is career advancement evaluated and accomplished in my field (academia, industry, teaching, etc)? The junk drawer – what are the miscellaneous skills and responsibilities of my career that I was never formally trained in?
    
APS Chapters: Why, How, What of Starting New Chapters
1:30-3 p.m. | Convention Center, W311A

The Need for Scientists in Regulation and Policy: Academia, Government, and Industry
2-3:30 p.m. | Convention Center, W206C

As the regulatory environment surrounding public health care, toxicology, and science (in general) rapidly changes, the voices of scientists have perhaps never been more important in influencing these policy debates. For example, many states have adapted “right to try” laws and/or have recently legalized medical (and recreational) cannabis use; however, Federal Laws do not necessarily mirror State Laws. Additionally, the balance between growing the economy and protecting the environment is also in a precarious position. This symposium will emphasize why/how scientists should/can get involved in science policy, advocacy, and regulation through careers in academia, government, and/or industry.
    
Surviving an Existential Threat - Creating a Niche for Basic Science Educators
4-5:30 p.m. | Convention Center, W206C

Healthcare education landscape is evolving rapidly in the backdrop of fast developing technology. This symposium will help you in your quest to stay at the forefront of healthcare education in this era of AI and automation. Educators from around the country with backgrounds in administration and expertise in teaching future physicians, nurses, pharmacists and physician assistants will share with you their collective wisdom and experience gained over the years. This symposium aims to help the audience make appropriate personal strategic planning, use popular models of tenure success, interprofessional teaching and the like in a changing healthcare environment for assured career advancement.

Tuesday, April 9, 2019

Career Planning: No Scientist Left Behind (Tuesday)
7-8 a.m. | Convention Center, W311C

In this symposium entitled “Career Planning: No Scientist Left Behind” sponsored by the Women in Physiology Committee, we will focus on a variety of topics. Topics to be covered include: 1) effectively dealing with and overcoming career interruptions; 2) how to fix the leaky pipeline by successfully promoting diversity and women in science; 3) what keeps women from rising to the highest ranks of academia and how to break the glass ceiling; and 4) identifying structural issues and successes within institutions. We will have three speakers. Our first speaker will be Dr. Jacqueline Limberg (a junior/early career scientist) from the University of Missouri. She will focus on dealing with multiple commitments to work/family/health and how she has successfully overcome a career interruption. The second speaker will be Dr. Irving Vega (a mid-career scientist) from Michigan State University. He will discuss successfully promoting diversity and women in science and “how to fix the leaky pipeline” vs . "how do we keep the faucet going". Our last speaker will be Dr. Nancy Fjortoft (Dean of Pharmacy) from Midwestern University. She will focus on how to break the glass ceiling in science by describing the successes seen at Midwestern University as inclusion has been achieved at the highest leadership levels at this institution. The goal of this symposium is to educate the audience on how to successfully deal with career interruptions, provide tips on how to promote diversity and women in science in order to “keep the faucet going”, and how to break the glass ceiling in science.
     
Marketing Yourself for a Successful Career III
7-8 a.m. | Convention Center, W311B

Having a successful career in both academic and non-academic environment requires constant and deliberate marketing of one’s self in order to get the desired job and to keep it. In a world that is highly competitive, it is extremely important that trainees begin early in their career to cultivate the skills needed to stand out as a competitive job applicant or a competitive candidate for promotion in the future. Aside from having excellent communication skills in scientific writing, there are other numerous career development abilities that are vital for continued success. These include taking on leadership positions within and outside of the laboratory environment, project and time management skills, building scientific network locally and nationally, and engaging in service and mentoring opportunities. To ensure that trainees are well prepared for a successful career in the future, the Trainee Advisory Committee (TAC) have invited experienced speakers to address three major areas of career development over the course of three days. The three areas are: 1) How to Build Marketable Skills, 2) How to Market yourself on Paper, and 3) How to Market yourself through Networking. Each speaker will give a 45 minutes presentation followed by a 15 minutes question and answer session. At the end of the symposium, trainees will have gained an understanding of how to develop the skills that are necessary to successfully market themselves for their desired job in any scientific setting.
     
The Hidden Job: Aspects of a Physiology Career You May not be Aware of
7-8 a.m. | Convention Center, W311D

This symposium is targeted at scientists and trainees interested in learning about aspects of careers in science that are not commonly part of traditional training. Issue: Careers in science require the development of a number of skills and proficiencies that extend beyond the normal training practices, which are primarily focused on technical, writing, and other “hard” skills. These include such things as negotiation skills, hiring and firing of lab personnel, scientific society involvement, areas of service, administrative responsibilities, organizing meetings and symposia, moving between academia and industry, and many others. The focus will be on those skills that are not a common aspect of training. Speakers will address these issues from a perspective of “what I wish I knew before I started this job” and “things no one told me I needed to know before I started.” Specific Goals of the Symposium: This symposium aims to discuss these topics in an interactive format facilitated by leaders in academic, industry, teaching, governmental, and society roles. The targeted audience of trainees and established investigators alike will be exposed to the perspectives of the facilitators and will be able to incorporate the non-traditional training advice of the facilitators into their individual career plans. Specific Questions the Panelists will Address: What skills are needed to manage a diverse group of individuals (hiring, firing, conflict management, etc.)? How do you transition from one sector to another, such as moves from academia to industry, military to civilian, industry to academia, etc.? How do you transition roles within your institution (administration, teaching, etc.)? How is career advancement evaluated and accomplished in my field (academia, industry, teaching, etc)? The junk drawer – what are the miscellaneous skills and responsibilities of my career that I was never formally trained in?
     
Teaching Blitz
2-3:30 p.m. | Convention Center, W206C

This session will showcase innovative strategies and methods for the teaching of pharmacology, physiology, biochemistry, and other biomedical science concepts. Selected speakers will present their inventive teaching practices or laboratory activities in brief interactive demonstrations followed by audience discussion. Participants will not only gain new teaching ideas but also guidance in how to implement these activities.
     
Body Donation Programs: What General Anatomy Faculty Should Know
3-4:30 p.m. | Convention Center


 

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